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Agriculture and Food

We do our best to address all the problems related to agriculture and food. You will have the opportunity to discover some of the best Haitian dishes as well

Making Plantain Purre or Labouyi Bannann, the Haitian Way

The making of Plantain Purre or Labouyi Bannann

A truly versatile meal that can be enjoyed at any time of the day, Plantain Purre or Labouyi Bannann is a favorite in Haiti. Its wholesome, filling portions make for a nutritious, appetizing treat.

What you will need:
• 1 plantain (green)
• 1 banana (ripe)
• 12 oz can of evaporated milk (soy milk can be substituted)
• 12 to 14 oz can of coconut milk, or 1 cup of regular milk
• 1/4 tsp. of vanilla extract
• 3 sticks of cinnamon
• 2 anise stars (whole)
• A pinch of grated nutmeg
• 1/2 a cup of sugar (can be either white or brown)
• 1/2 tsp. lime rind (grated) or 1/2 an inch lime rind (whole)

What you should do:
1. Peel the plantain and then cut it into slices of about 1/2 an inch in thickness.
2. Puree plantain slices in a blender with 2 cups of water and the ripe banana.
3. Bring plantain and banana puree to boil over low to medium heat and bring to a boil.
4. Add additional ingredients, evaporated or soy milk, coconut milk or regular milk, vanilla extract, anise stars, sugar, lime rind and nutmeg.
5. Bring to boil and stir occasionally.
6. Cook for 15-20 minutes until it becomes the consistency of oatmeal. Serve while still hot.

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Toussaint Coffee Liqueur Being Re-Marketed in Great Britain

Toussaint Coffee Liqueur, named for Haiti's liberator, Toussaint Louverture, is a more intense version of Mexico's Tia Maria and Kahlua. It is less sweet and contains a richer coffee flavor. A blend of Arabica coffee beans and aged Caribbean rum, with an alcohol content of 30%, it became popular in Europe and other import markets.

For undisclosed reasons, the Toussaint Coffee Liqueur brand was discontinued, and had not been available anywhere except perhaps on the island under another name. But Quintessential Brands, which owns the patent, transferred from its original creator, Anker Horn, signed a new licensing agreement with G&J Distillers to produce the liqueur with a new recipe as well as a redesigned bottle.

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Aaron Sanchez and John Besh, got cool reception at "Marche Communal de Kinskoff"

Chef Aaron Sanchez and New Orleans Chef John Besh in Kenskoff, Haiti

They came with the promise of publicity to bring awareness to the plight of Haiti's food crisis. The idea was that they could raise awareness of the current conditions by touring facilities like the farmers market, snapping pictures of desperate adults and children and talking with the press in Haiti and abroad about the experience. However, one Haitian mayor wanted none of it, and wasn't afraid to protect what she viewed as the integrity of her town from the intrusive good-doing of two celebrity chefs.

John Besh, a finalist on the Food Network show, The Next Iron Chef, and Aaron Sanchez, who appeared on the shows, Heat Seekers and Chopped on the same network, flew in to Haiti on Sunday, July 28th and promptly toured one of the numerous settlements established by the homeless in the wake of the earthquake three years ago.

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Caribbean immigrants using food stamps to ship food to family back home

An unconventional food-stamp practice has been occurring for months, perhaps years in the U.S. It has been discovered immigrants from the Caribbean region, including Haiti have been using their food-stamp allotments to send food to family back home.

Defrauders use their food-stamp debit cards to purchase food items impossible to find, or afford in the Dominican Republic, Jamaica, and Haiti. They spend months filling 50-gallon barrels with $2,000 worth of food staples. The barrels aren't cheap, costing about $40. An additional $70 is required to ship the barrels to Haiti, a three-week journey. Even immigrants who can't get food stamps save for months on end to fill a barrel with essential food items to send back home.

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Carnival of Flowers 2013, "Yon Ayisyen, Yon pye bwa

Carnival of Flowers 2013,

The Carnival of Flowers held in July 2012 was big success in Haiti and hence, the same will be repeated this year from July 28 through 30. The same leitmotiv "Yon Ayisyen, Yon pye bwa" will be there but with different décor. There will be flowers everywhere from Sylvio Cator Stadium to the Champ de Mars and will pass through Casernes street and Grand-rue. The Ministry of Culture is planning on this great event along with National Police, Secretariat of State for the Public Safety, Ministry of Tourism, the Primature and the Presidency.

Haiti News - Preparation pour le carnaval des Fleurs 2013

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President Michel Martelly, an expert in Tomtom ak Kalalou Gombo

Tomtom ak Kalalou Gombo

The Haitian President Michel Martelly is working on his next career. In this picture, he is having the ingredients for making Tomtom mashed in a "pilon."

The regional dish Tomtom is unique to Jérémie and the Grand'Anse Department of Haiti. It is made of steamed breadfruit (lam veritab) mashed. One very important aspect of this dish is that you can't chew it. Tomtom is made into round balls and swallowed with a sauce made of okra (kalalou, Gombo) cooked with meat, fish, crab, and spices.

What you will need to make Tomtom ak Kalalou Gombo :
• 1 breadfruit
• 2 tbsp. pikliz
• 1 tsp. sea salt
• 1 small onion (sliced)
• 1/4 tsp. black pepper (freshly ground)
• 1 tbsp. olive oil
• 1 lb okra (frozen or fresh)
• 1/4 lb of in-season seafood (pre-soaked salted fish or cooked fish or crab)
• 1 cup of djon-djon mushrooms
• 1/2 tbsp. tomato paste
• Lemon zest
• 1 tsp garlic powder

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Haiti's Food Shortage Crippling Poor Families

Haiti has been bracing for an extreme food shortage, and it is arriving as the June and July harvests are set to begin. This year's rainfall is anticipated to be well below average. The Spring-Summer harvest season is important because crop yields comprise two-thirds of the harvest that contributes to the island's yearly food output.

Other factors causing agricultural underproduction include 2012's drought and two major hurricanes that hit that year as well. Of the 10 million people living on the island, 75% of them exist on barely $2.00 a day. Of this figure, 1.5 million are suffering from malnutrition, 82,000 of them pre-schoolers. Unfortunately, the country experiences one of the highest levels of child hunger in the Western Hemisphere, which contributes to its high ranking on the failed states index.

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Chicken and egg war - Haiti Dominican Republic triggered by H5N2 or bird flu

Chicken and egg fight between Haiti and Dominican Republic

Dominican Republic and Haiti are located on the same island which has a long and troubled history. For centuries people in the two countries have shared common history and shared their cultures but now, the borders of the two countries are all heated up because of chickens! On 6th of June Haiti refused to import agricultural products from Dominican Republic. This event coincided with the DR's deportation of immigrants from Haiti on a large scale.

On either sides of the border the protests have increased to significant scale as a result of which, the foreign ministers of both Dominican Republic and Haiti have failed to reach an agreement. Activities of product and people crossing borders have completed stopped in two borders out of total four shared by the two countries. Even binational markets that used to operate daily have completely stopped operations.

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New Poultry Policy to be in effect between Haiti and Dominican Republic

Chicken and egg fight between Haiti and Dominican Republic

Coming out of the recent ban on all poultry products from the Dominican Republic, the Veterinary Services of Haiti and its nearest neighbor met in a technical meeting held on June 19, 2012 to discuss the issues and come up with feasible solutions.

The results were that the ban on poultry would be lifted, allowing the critical trade from the Dominican Republic to continue, under certain restrictions. First, a committee of experts from the two countries, aided by outside organizations, will convene to create a protocol in regards to the treatment of the trade in light of the avian flu, which had been the cause of the ban initially.

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Artibonite Signature Dish - Lalo Legume Fey

Artibonite most famous Dish, Lalo legume fey

Lalo Legume Fey is a signature dish of Artibonite. Any Artibonitenne, one must know how to prepare this dish properly. It is a staple food of the area made using rice, beans and lalo. The dish is not only filling but is also hearty and tasty and is known for high amounts of protein and iron. The dish is made using different kinds of green vegetables. The greens that are generally used include lalo, spinach, watercress and purslane. Meat is also required for the preparation and is cooked one day ahead of preparing the dish.

How to prepare Lalo Legume Fey?

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