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Art

The haitian art is well known around the world for its vivid colors and the descricpion of the landscape. We are very familiar to the Centre d'Art Haitien in Port-au-Prinec and the discovering of so many great Haitian Masters such as the Cap-haitian school, Poto mitan, etc

Ayiti land of high mountains art project in Little Haiti

Little Haiti Art Project in memory of victims of Haiti earthquake

Little Haiti in Miami will continue to be a reference for the Haitian community. This connection will be more obvious in the near future as the Miami Mountains Foundation plans to transform a Little Haiti median with its "Ayiti, Land of High Mountains" public art display.

Miami-Dade County just approved the funding for a project to transform an underused road median in Little Haiti area on NE second Avenue with vibrant public art demonstrating Haiti as a land of high mountains. This public art display will be one more reason to make Little Haiti a tourist destination, will be there on a permanent basis

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Laundromat Art Space & Studio in Little Haiti

Laundromat Art Space is the best novel contemporary art studio in Miami since last May. It is the ideal place for Artist Residency Program where the mid-career Miami artists can host their art exhibitions in the heart of downtown Little Haiti.

Its 4500 square foot space houses one art gallery and nine studios where nine resident artists can create anything within their domain from sculpture to paint or photography, textile, printmaking and beyond. The studio will regularly organize community programs and contemporary art exhibitions. The center fosters collaboration between multidisciplinary creativities under the shadow of own Caribbean Culture that defines Little Haiti. Enriching a community culture through art while maintaining its distinct characteristics, can sometimes be a challenge. The art center is presented by a Miami based non- profit organization 'The Rise Up Gallery" that provided low cost art training workshop to the community. David McCauley is the executive director of Rise Up Gallery, the nonprofit group behind Laundromat. Out of 11,000 applicants, Laundromat happens to be one of 71 finalists in the 2015 Knight Arts Challenge Grant.

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Modern Haitian Art transforms the Common into the Extraordinary

The evolution of 200 years of Haitian art from naïve painting to surrealist interpretation through found objects is being exhibited at the Grand Palais in Paris. The theme Haiti: Two Centuries of Artistic Creation displays the work of such noted Haitian artists as Hector Hyppolite and Herve Telemaque.

Hyppolite, known as an excellent naïve painter, received high praise from surrealist movement exponent Andre Breton, who declared Hyppolite a surrealist. Breton became mesmerized by Hyppolite's artless expression in his work.

Herve Telemaque, a modern painter residing in France, gave tribute to Hyppolite with his painting Le Voyage d'Hector Hyppolite en Afrique. Its theme centers on religious iconography, immigrant beginnings, and infamous political leaders, with Hyppolite as the central figure journeying through history.

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Haitian Art re-defined at Paris's Grand Palais Gallery Exhibition

An exhibition of Haitian art produced over the last 200-plus years is currently on display at Grand Palais. Entitled "Haiti: Two Centuries of Artistic Creation" the show features 160-plus pieces of work, created by Haitian artists either living in Haiti or abroad. Four themes make up the exhibition, and are shown in a single, large space. This arrangement curators Regine Cuzin and Ateliers Jerome say forces art lovers to view Haitian art history as more than just the conventional naïve and primitive styles that have categorized Haitian art in the U.S. and Europe.

Unknown to U.S. and European art collectors, Haitian artists began in the 1950s to move away neocolonial art and create abstract pieces of work. But a bias against the exciting new work was dismissed by critics ". . . as not properly Haitian . . ." and not promoted.

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Haitian artist Ulrick Jean-Pierre and the work of Sisters of the Holy Family

An artist with a subject to which he can make an emotional connection is bound to create a thing of transcendental beauty. When that artist is Haitian, the culture of the artist's country, the use of emotion in each stroke, the richness of the color and simply the staging of the piece all work to complete the work of art. The artist is Ulrick Jean-Pierre, and his subject was one Henriette Delille. Delille was a free, colored women who founded the Sisters of the Holy Family. It is that sisterhood which commissioned the work and in whose motherhouse, located at 6901 Chef Menteur Highway, the work now hangs.

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Haitian Art receiving Global Recognition in the New Millennium

Haitian art was originally rooted in African and Taino art forms, then became influenced by the artistic expressions of France and Spain. The subject matter of Haitian art has tended to focus on the island's history, its socioeconomic and political conflicts, family life, religion, and culture.

Haitian schools of art, with their particular qualities or styles of expression, are localized. Southern coastal Jacmel artists use mountains and shorelines for inspiration; northern coastal Cap-Haitien artists render urban life; Saint-Soleil artists' work embodies abstract art, using Voodoo motifs. And Artibonite region painters utilize muted tones and geometric shapes.

Throughout the early- to late-1800s Haiti's rulers supported artists by creating opportunities for them to develop their artistic expression. King Christophe, Emperor Soulouque, and President Geffrard all promoted artists or founded schools for them. In 1840 the Imperial Academy of Drawing and Painting was introduced, and in the 1860s there existed the Academy of Art.

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Teaching Artist Maxine Montilus and the Ti Atis Program

Brooklyn-born artist Maxine Montilus is a dancer and choreographer who is now working as part of the Ti Atis Afterschool Workshop. The program, which began in February 2013 is put on by the Haiti Cultural Exchange (HCX), and is operated at P.S. 189.

Last year, the program had two sections, a collaborative mural project led by Jules Joseph, a visual artist, for 4th and 5th grade students, and a photo narrative workshop for students in the 6th and 7th grades, led by Richard Louissaint, photographer. This year, it is Ms. Montilus, a first-generation Haitian-American, who holds a B.F.A from the University of Arts in Modern Dance Performance and an M.A. from City University London in Arts Management who will take up the mantle. Montilus is slated to lead a 10-week arts residency called "Creative Expression through Movement".

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Name and pictures of some escaped from prison of Croix des Bouquets

List of escapees from Prison of Croix-des-Bouquets

Here it is folks. the Haitian authorities has accomplished something historic. Something that was almost impossible to be done was realized by the Haitian government and the Haitian Police force. Finally, after close to a Month in waiting, the authorities has published the names and pictures of some of the people who escaped the Civil prison of Croix des Bouquets.

Things are not perfect and it si something hard to come up with. However, part of it is now done. Maybe in a few more months, all the pictures and names will be released.

I counted so far from these published pictures, 44 people. This is 44 out of over three hundreds escapees

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Edouard Duval-Carrie at Perez Art Museum Miami

Edouard Duval-Carrie, a Haitian-American and internationally renowned painter, began life in Port-au-Prince when Francois Duvalier was the brutal dictator of Haiti. During his boyhood, he started art classes at Centre d'Art in Port-au-Prince. His family left Haiti to escape Duvalier's oppressive rule.

Eventually he ended up in Montreal where he hit the books at University of Loyola. He rose in the art world and was extended an invitation by Paris's École Nationale Supérieure des Beaus-Arts to study there. He experienced some modest success during his stay of 11 years, but remained on the fringes of the art scene.

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Craft Village in Choiseul, Milot

North Ministry of Tourism in Haiti has been busy with construction projects to attract more tourism to the region. Several projects are ongoing, and more are planned to begin soon. Royal Caribbean Cruise Line's (RCCL) Vice President, Frank Byrne, led a two-day tour to view progress being made on projects in Cap-Haitien, Milot, and the Bay of Acul du Nord.

The initial stop was Cap-Haitien, where a craft market is being built for the tourist trade. Next was Milot where several projects to improve tourism infrastructure are nearing completion. A craft market is being built, as well as public toilets, a health clinic, restaurant, and information kiosks. The group also surveyed Sans-Souci Palace and Citadelle la Ferriere sites. Following, Byrne met with the press to share news a push is happening to lure eco-tourists to the North region for biking events. Dieudonne Etienne, North Regional Director of the Ministry of Tourism, announced a police sub-station to be built in Milot for the comfort and safety of tourists.

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