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Child Abuse

Do you know why an International Youth Day was created?

International Youth Day

International Youth Day is observed annually on 12 August

International Youth Day (IYD) is an awareness day designated by the United Nations, which is observed every year on August 12, since 2000. It is celebrated all around the world with an objective to raise awareness about issues that affect young people who are aged between 15 and 24 years of old, making up one-sixth of the global human population. Each year the occasion is observed with a specific theme. The theme of 2015 was "Youth Civic Engagement" and the slogan for 2014 was "Youth and Mental Health." The logo of United Nation is often associated with the marketing and promotional material for this event. In the face of hardship, 'International Youth Day' is an effort to make sure that young people have the critical skills, tools, and support that they need to become healthy, productive and engaged members of society and they bring great leadership and resilience.

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Sister Dona found innocent after spending 42 months in prison

Sister Dona found innocent after 42 months in prison

This is a lesson of dedication and commitment. After spending 42 months in prison for something she did not do, Sister Dona is once again free. Dieudonne Pierre Bélizaire, better known as Sister Dona who founded the orphanage Sister Redeemer of Nazareth, was cleared from charges of kidnapping, child trafficking and criminal conspiracy in a criminal court in Port-au-Prince, Haiti and released immediately. As a reminder, Sister Dona was arrested and put in prison in June 2012 for the disappearance of child Raphaël Chenet. The father of the child accused sister Dona of selling his child. Sister Dona has consistently claimed her innocence.

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Orphanage recruiters roaming Haiti with money or false promises

International adoption agencies have been taking advantage of poor Haitian parents, luring them to give up their children for adoption. The agencies offer money and assurances the children will be adopted temporarily until the parents can afford to take care of their children again.

The government of Haiti (GOH) has put new restrictions in place to close loop holes in the country's adoption system. The GOH now bans private adoptions, has made accreditation more difficult for foreign adoption agencies to receive, and restricts the number of children available for adoption every year. Rules have also been dictated to focus on grievances brought by parents saying they were persuaded to turn their children over, ignorant of the resulting consequences.

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Haitian Father can no longer come home for beating problem son

Child abused as Restavek

A Haitian pastor in Port Chester though that he was doing what he needed to do to prevent his son from becoming a delinquent and likely a criminal or a problem to society found himself in jail for just that. Pastor Precie Guerrier was in court on December 18, 2013, facing charges for beating his 12 year old son because the son was behaving badly in school.

Mezanmi koze pa pou ou. Eske nou tande problem? Yon pastè Aysyen ki touve li ape reponn kestion lajistis paske li ape eseye korije yon ti moun li ki ape bay problem lekol. Eske li tap pi bon si ke paran ti gacon sa te kite li ak komporman sa olye ke li eseye fosse li change li? Eske se pa minm problem sa yo ke anpil paran ayisyen trouve yo lè ke ti moun yo decide pou yo bay problem?

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Restavek Freedom Foundation's Mission to end Restavek in Haiti

Living with a complex of inferiority - Restavek in Haiti

Restavek is a cruel and inhumane practice that has been allowed to flourish in Haiti for decades. Restavek, translated from Créole, means "to stay with". In this system, ignorant parents, who cannot support their children, deliver them to families, who ostensibly can.

But in truth, they are anything but cared for. Sent to work as house servants, young girls between 5-15 years are beaten and sexually abused, forced to sleep on the floor. They must begin laboring at dawn, doing tasks that are humiliating, like washing out bedpans; or hard labor, carrying heavy pails of water from wells back to their houses.

The international community is aware of the horrors of restavek, and increased numbers of Christian and non-profit organizations are working to save children and educate Haitian communities the practice is immoral and unacceptable. In Haiti, restavek is embedded in the culture.

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Rocco, Madonna's son in Haiti - Ti moun san Pantalon: Why?

Rocco, Madonna's son in Haiti for Charity work

Here is a picture of Rocco, Madonna's son in Haiti with a group of deprived children. In this particular picture, he is sharing a candid pictures as he is taking a group of children to something that looks to be one of the their charity work. Eske Li reellman necesè pou yo montre ti moun yo san pantalon?

Mon cher, mwen kapab di-ou, si pou yon moun kompran ke pou li fè moin Kado yon bagay, fok li himilye-m, mwen pa bezoin li.

I think that for a boy like Rocco, the son of a multi Million dollar artist to be thinking about poor, deprived children from a poor country such as Haiti, it is to be commended. However, my question stands: Why the humiliation, why can't you give me something why giving me all the respects I deserve.

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What an irony, Haiti, first to abolish slavery, now one of the highest countries in modern day slavery

First Independent Nation and Modern Day slavery restavek

Haiti, the first black-led republic in the world, gained independence in 1804 as part of a successful slave revolution. The slaves in Saint-Domingue revolted and fought against one of the most sophisticated army at the time because they believe that all man are equal and that slavery should be abolished.

Now how can you understand this today. An Australian Foundation came up with a report recently listing Haiti as the second country with the highest per capita globally engaging in modern day slavery after India.

According to the report, about two percent of the Haitian population are living as forced child labor known as "restavec"

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Maurice Sixto is credited for bringing restavek problem in the open

Who was the famous Maurice Sixto?

Maurice Alfrédo Sixto, one of the biggest names in Haitian literature, was the son of an engineer Maurice Alfredo Sixto (father and son bears the same name) was born on 23 May 1919 in Gonaives, Haiti. He was a man of many colors-- a professor, ambassador, translator, tour guide, reporter are some of them to name a few. He will be remembered for his immense contribution in Haitian Creole language that took Haitian culture to a glorious stature. His father was a rich man.

In his childhood, Maurice Sixto attended the most prestigious school (Saint Louis de Gonzague), after completing high school lessons, he studied at Haitian Military Academy for a couple of months and joined for law courses. While studying his law course, he worked as a news reporter and a radio presenter. Thereafter his career took new turns and he worked as an English teacher in Republic of Congo. He left Congo in 1969 and decided to settle in Paris and work as Haitian diplomat in France.

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Michigan Matthew Andrew Carter, sentenced to 165 years for sexually abusing children in Haiti

Matthew Andrew Carter of the Morning Star Center sexually abused Haitian Children

Matthew Andrew Carter, a man from Michigan, USA, who operated a home for poor children in Haiti as a guise through which he could sexually abuse the children, has been sentenced to 165 years in prison by a judge in Miami. The 68 year old man tried to discredit the witnesses who spoke against him, but, after an hour and a half of deliberations, the federal jury convicted Carter on five counts of leaving the United States for the specific purpose of sexually assaulting minors as well as one count of attempting child sex tourism.

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Facts On Children Living In Haiti

There are a lot of facts to know about children in Haiti. Primary school is attended by just about 20% of the children and after primary grade many of the children don't attend school. Many of the schools barely have canteens or cafeterias.

Estimates On Status Of Haitian Children As Per 1998
As per estimates of 1998, the death rate per 1000 children was 99. Lack of care and medication are the main reasons for 25% to 30% death of children in the provinces. It is through a church that the missionaries support around 60% of the private schools in Haiti. Around 60% of the children hardly get three meals per day. Many of the children have no breakfast or lunch.

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