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Creole Translation

Court Interpreter and the Oral Examination

A Court Interpreter is someone who works with the court system to provide language interpretation for those who do not speak fluent English. It is a demanding profession that requires much more than being bilingual. A court interpreter plays a vital role in court proceedings as he translates spoken words from one language to another in legal settings, such as courtrooms and law offices. Undoubtedly, the most important skill for an interpreter is the ability to speak two languages fluently, but conversational fluency is only the starting point, because court translators and interpreters must also understand the court system and its vocabulary and terminology.

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Job Description of a Court Interpreter

The job of a Court Interpreters is to translate information from one language into another for the court systems. They work with lawyers, witnesses and defendants to relay information for depositions, hearings and other court cases. It is an Interpreter's job to orally translate everything that is said. They should be fluent in multiple languages as per requirement of the court and have the ability to understand the tone of conversation in languages known because they communicate back and forth among the people who do not share a common language.

The goal of an interpreter is to have people hear the interpretation as if it were the original. He must render a complete and accurate interpretation or translation, without altering, omitting, or adding anything to what is stated or written, and without explanation.

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How to Become a Court Interpreter

A Court Interpreter is someone who works with the court system to provide language interpretation for those who do not speak fluently the language used in the court. Court interpreters are called upon for special judicial cases that require translating oral speech into another language. Suppose, if any witnesses have been called to the stand who don't speak English or the language primarily used in the court, such witnesses should have a reliable way of expressing themselves acceptable in the eye of law.

Although a college degree or certification is often required to become a court interpreter, there are exceptions as the most important skill is the ability to speak two languages fluently. However, conversational fluency is only the starting point, because court translators and interpreters must also understand the court system and its vocabulary and terminology.

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How Much Money Do Court Interpreters Make?

The job of a court interpreter is a very rewarding profession. As per July 1, 2018 statistical reports, the average annual salary range for U.S federal and state staff court interpreters is between $30,000 and $80,000 with a median of $47,190 . The range of salaries depends on the level of experience. An interpreter or translator with less than five years of experience can expect to earn an average of $40,000 a year. However, they have limited employment opportunity, mostly work as an independent contractor.

Moreover, their pays not only varies with experience, it greatly depends on the place of their work. Full-time court interpreters in California make an average salary between $71,000 and $84,261. In Florida, they start at much lower at $43,331, but can make up to $86,662. In New York, interpreters make between $54,000 and $75,000. Court interpreters in Wisconsin make much less at an annual average salary between $25,000 and $50,000. The amount of money that a court interpreter makes also varies with the federal court system. Certified and professionally qualified interpreters who work on a contract basis make $418 per day. If they work a half-day, they make $226. The overtime rate for certified and professionally qualified interpreters is $59 per hour. Language-skilled non-certified interpreters make $202 for a full day. The half-day rate is $111. Overtime pay for language-skilled non-certified interpreters is $35 per hour.

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Haitian Creole Interpretation

We launched our Haitian Creole Translation Service in he year 2000. We translates every type of documents, including quality, research-based educational resources, marketing materials, medical publications, and legal contracts. We have a professional team of Haitian translators who translate materials in Haitian Creole so that the translated materials from the linguistic perspective, are appropriate for a variety of corporate, institutional, and academic settings located in the United States and Canada. We also strive to provide translations that are consistent and appropriate all across Martinique, Guadeloupe, Dominica, and Haiti both from the perspectives of selectively chosen vocabulary and language structure. The lyrics are not translated in a word-for-word manner--sense of the text is always preserved. Materials are translated by retaining key Creole terminologies as much as possible to support language development.

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Haitian Creole Translation for Early Childhood Development

Learning to speak in the mother tongue is very important for a child's overall development. All children, no matter which language their parents speak, learn a language in the same way. When babies are born, they can make and hear all the sounds in their surroundings. When you talk to your child, you support her language development. A child's brain develops during the first three years of a child's life. Research indicates that learning through mother tongue leads to a much better understanding of the curriculum as well as a more positive attitude towards school. Research has clearly shown that mother tongue has a very important role in children's overall development. The stronger the children's mother tongue, the easier it is for them to discover new areas. UNESCO has encouraged mother tongue instruction in primary education since 1953. Mother tongue is crucial in framing the thinking and emotions of people. Language is clearly the key to communication and understanding in the classroom.

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Haitian Creole Language Translation

The word "Creole" simply means a mixture of different languages--it could be French based Creole or English-based, or Portuguese or Arabic based, etc. Haitian Creole emerged from contact between French settlers and African slaves during the Atlantic slave trade in the French colony of Saint-Domingue (now Haiti). It originated in the 18th century mostly with influence from Portuguese, Spanish, English, Taíno, and West African languages. In the present day, it is the main spoken language for 9 million people living in Haiti and further 400,000 emigrated Haitians living in the Bahamas, Canada, Cayman Islands, Cuba, French Guiana, Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, Guadeloupe, and United States.

Many different agencies provide a range of translation services for business customers and individual clients. They translate documents for the web, for print and for use within companies. Some of them provide top notch customer service with 24X7 support at the most affordable rate. They are translating all manner of documents.

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Haitian dishwashers to get $2.5 million after banned from speaking Creole

Creole ranked 10th most common foreign language spoken at Home in United States

Four years ago, the SLS South Beach Hotel in Miami was hit with a lawsuit by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission for alleged discrimination against their Haitian workers. Seventeen Haitian dishwashers employed there were forbidden from speaking Haitian Creole. The Haitian workers were also asked to drag heavy items up the the 13th floor of the hotel by stairs. For the Hispanic workers, not only they were free to chat Spanish, they also did not have to carry any heavy items anywhere.

One time, a Haitian worker asked his manager to fix the broken service elevator in the hotel, the boss stated:

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Haiti Language Crisis - Do they speak French or Creole

Language is an important aspect in any nation. It is what unites a country and bridges it with the international community. More importantly, language is what makes every citizen understand each other.

That seems not to be the case in Haiti.

Having a language barrier can be a challenge to any country. Haiti faces language difficulties as there are two main languages that are widely used: the Creole and the French. People and linguists have different opinions on both these languages and how they affect Haiti society.

The majority of Haitians speak Creole. However, its value has been undermined because of the mandatory use of French in schools. There are schools that penalize students for speaking Creole despite the fact that the constitution recognizes both Creole and French as official languages.

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The Argument for Professional Haitian Creole Translators

Haitian Creole Translation

Like any other languages, Haitian Creole is not something that you can teach or translate easily. It would take a professional to translate such language efficiently. Just because it is derived from the French language does not necessarily mean that a French person can successfully translate it. Keep in mind that Haitian Creole and French have a lot of differences. Though Haitian Creole draws a huge influence from the French language, it also has touches of Native American, West African, Spanish, Portuguese and Arabic languages. With this, the only one who can accurately translate it is a professional Haitian Creole translator.

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