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health care

Risk for Hepatitis, Malaria, Typhoid, Cholera, Rabies, Yellow Fever in Haiti

Vaccines protect travelers from serious diseases. Depending on where you travel, you may come into contact with diseases that are rare in your country. It is recommended to get vaccinated at least 4 to 6 weeks before you travel. This will give the vaccines time to start working, so you're protected while you're traveling. Travelers can get typhoid through contaminated food or water in Haiti. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends typhoid vaccine for most travelers, especially if you are staying with friends or relatives, visiting smaller cities or rural areas, or if you are an adventurous eater.

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President Privert cancelled trip to Jacmel due to health Issues

Jocelerme Privert Health status

What's wrong with President Privert? We just learned that the President was scheduled to travel to the city of Jacmel to celebrate its Patronal feast of Saint Jacques and Philippe as well as the festival of agriculture and labor but was unable to make it.

He was unable to make the trip due to health issues. That is what the Communication Office of the presidency announced. Presiddent Privert however, took the opportunity to wish all Haitian workers, to all sectors of national life, and to all Haitians in general, a Happy Feast of Agriculture and Labor.

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About 70 percent of Haitians in treatment for HIV/AIDS lives over 10 years

Fight against AIDS in Haiti Succeeding

A new research that just came out would confirms that it is no longer a death sentence for Haitians living with HIV/AIDS.

According to a research published in The New England Journal of Medicine, ten years after a free treatment program was introduced in Haiti for people infected with the HIV/AIDS virus, close to two third of the patients enrolled in the treatment were still alive. Out of 910 patients recruted at a Port-au-prince clinic, between 63 percent and 71 percent of them had survived 10 years.

The study found that the surviving rate in Haiti was similar to the rate found among gay men in the US who started antiretroviral triple therapy in the late 1990s

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After Chikungunya and Dengue, now it's Ziga fever alert in Haiti

Zika virus infection alert in Haiti

It's like dealing with Cholera which was a gift from MINUSTAH to the Haitian people was not enough. We also had recent outbreaks of Chikungunya, Dengue and our major health scare about Ebola. Still we now have something new to deal with, the Zika virus infection. As a result of recent warning by the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO/WHO) of cases of Zika virus infection in our region, the Minister of Public Health in Haiti has implemented early warning system to detect potential cases of the Zika infection in the Haitian population. Mosquitoes are considered to be the primary vectors of the virus. So far all specimens of mosquitoes, tested have turned out negative.

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Cervical cancer and breast cancer are leading killers of Haitian women

Health

According to Dr. Jean Ronald Cornelly Director of Oncology Program at the Ministry of Public Health and Population in Haiti cancer is a major health problem in Haiti. Women between the ages of 40 and 50 years have a bigger chance of dying from either cervical cancer and breast cancer than anything else.

Kreyol:

Eske nou konnin plis fanm mou ak Kanser ke tout lot bagay an Ayiti. Anpil fanm Ayisyen ki mouri, se pa Djab ki pran yo, se souvan yon kanser ki fini ak moun sa yo.

On 4th February, 2015, Dr. Jean Ronald Cornelly, the Director of Oncology Program at the Ministry of Public Health and Population (MSPP) has said that cancer, like globally, is a serious health threat in Haiti that needs immediate attention. Most of the cancer cases in women are cervical and breast cancers and commonly, it becomes life threatening between 40 and 50 years of age. Dr. Jean Cornelly while addressing on the World Cancer Day, has reminded that with cancer, Haiti has one of the highest incidence and mortality rate in the world, because we are not well equipped to diagnose the disease at the early stage and neither have we had structured program nor good treatment for the malady. He cited one recent report from the World Health Organization (WHO) which suggests that as per regional statistics on the Latin American and Caribbean zone, Haiti has the highest incidence of this deadly disease. Out of 100,000 cases, 93.2 women suffer from cervical cancer and of that, 53.2 women dies from it. Dr Vincent De Gennaro, the Head of Internal Medicine for the project Medishare, has explained that the reason for such high mortality rate is that 80% of the patients never report until the disease is at an advanced stage.

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Around-the-clock medical care now available in Haiti via webcam or Telemedicine

Telemedicine or medecine via web cam in Haiti

There is a chance that your doctor will not be in the same room with you soon. In addition, you might not be able to touch him/her either. This actually is taking place as we speak in Haiti.

Technology has reached Haiti n ways we could not even imagine few years ago. Thanks to the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Haitian currently living in Haiti now have access to some of the best doctors in the world via web cam.

UM internist, Dr. Antonia Eyssallenne, who flies to Port-au-Prince regularly, says doctors at Bervard Mevs can perform the stabilization procedures but ". . . there are cases that require more sophisticated and specialized attention to manage properly." The UM trauma specialists' job is to advise and support doctors they are performing the procedures correctly. The benefit of the telemedicine service is that doctors' comfort and confidence levels increase with a virtual trauma specialist at hand, monitoring the trauma treatment.

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In Haiti where the sick is cared for by families, how would we prevent a spread of Ebola

Haiti Bans Citizens from Ebola UN Volunteer Mission in Africa

As we all have been have been observing the development of the ebola virus, some would say it is just a matter of time before the first case appears in Haiti. Although this is something I would not wish on the country, it is important to consider this option as it is a possibility.

What will the Haitian authorities do if ebola appears in Haiti? Let's share some critical information about the virus.

One, we all know that it only becomes contagious after the infected person start showing symptoms. if someone is infected with the virus but does not show any symptoms, that person can't infect another.

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Mid-Wives for Haiti Helps to Lower Neo-natal Deaths

Haiti, which suffered a crushing and debilitating earthquake in 2010, needs health-care workers, particularly in maternal and neo-natal care. Statistics reveal mothers during child-birth and neonates suffer 50 times the rate of child-birth mortalities than women in the U.S. Haitian women experience difficult pregnancies with dangerous blood-pressure levels, anemia, and sometimes cholera.

U.S mid-wives have arrived on a mission to bring down the death toll. And what they have found is distressing. The ratio of mid-wives to maternity patients is two for every 33 in labor. Mid-wives often work 24-hour shifts, sometimes for a week. Exhausted, they fall asleep, abandoning their charges. Women, who have already delivered, die from hemorrhaging that does not receive attention because of mid-wives' sleep deprivation. And during early hours of the morning they fear for their security, vulnerable to rapists. As a result they leave their patients alone.

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UN chief appoints Paul Farmer as special advisor on Haiti

Cholera has been Haiti's worst health problem for the past few years. From 2010 to the present, there has been a series of outbreaks of this contagious, deadly disease, claiming the lives of about 8,000 Haitians and hospitalizing thousands of men, women, and children. With the country's health care insufficient for its people and in poor conditions and without immediate action, the outbreak could get worse in the next few years to come.

To address Haiti's cholera and health care problem, the United Nations, who has been very active in helping out the country since the 2010 earthquake, delegated the Doctor Paul Farmer from the United States as the UN Secretary-General Ban Ki- moon's special advisor for Community Based Medicine and Lessons on Haiti last December. Several of Farmer's duties are to assist in building support for the fight against cholera in the country and give advice and education on the different medical techniques and alternatives that could be utilized and applied in Haiti and other affected places.

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What we pay for our Fears

They steal, rape, kidnap, and kill their way into many people's fears. Aside from these threatening uninvited visitors, the ordinary household could turn into a danger zone because of the simplest of objects and areas. Knives, loose electric wires, flights of stairs, and even a banana peel could prove to be very fatal.

Fear dominates the existence of the human race. That is why some businesses try to make money out of it. Billions of dollars are spent on products and services that supposedly ensure the safety and well-being of an individual. This is what people pay for the sake making their fears come true, but to what extent?

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