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How Much Money Do Court Interpreters Make?

The job of a court interpreter is a very rewarding profession. As per July 1, 2018 statistical reports, the average annual salary range for U.S federal and state staff court interpreters is between $30,000 and $80,000 with a median of $47,190 . The range of salaries depends on the level of experience. An interpreter or translator with less than five years of experience can expect to earn an average of $40,000 a year. However, they have limited employment opportunity, mostly work as an independent contractor.

Moreover, their pays not only varies with experience, it greatly depends on the place of their work. Full-time court interpreters in California make an average salary between $71,000 and $84,261. In Florida, they start at much lower at $43,331, but can make up to $86,662. In New York, interpreters make between $54,000 and $75,000. Court interpreters in Wisconsin make much less at an annual average salary between $25,000 and $50,000. The amount of money that a court interpreter makes also varies with the federal court system. Certified and professionally qualified interpreters who work on a contract basis make $418 per day. If they work a half-day, they make $226. The overtime rate for certified and professionally qualified interpreters is $59 per hour. Language-skilled non-certified interpreters make $202 for a full day. The half-day rate is $111. Overtime pay for language-skilled non-certified interpreters is $35 per hour.

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Florida students learning English can now wait two years before standardized test

Florida's education system and the federal government have been in a dispute, regarding the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. A rule stipulates students, who are learning English as a second language (ESL), must have standardized test scores counted as part of their grades after being in the country one year.

Pam Stewart, Florida Education Commissioner, and Governor Rick Scott, deeming the waiting period too short, asked for a waiver. The federal government denied it, causing the pair to request an amendment, asking for two years. They threatened a lawsuit if their request was denied. To avoid a lawsuit, the federal government approved the request with the provision Florida send test scores to the U.S. Department of Education of ESL students in the Florida system under two years.

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Creole ranked 10th most common foreign language spoken at Home in United States

Creole ranked 10th most common foreign language spoken at Home in United States

The presence of the Haitian community in the United States is undeniable. Whether in politic, school or at the work place, it is hard to avoid our influence. A recent report just released has discovered that the Haitian presence and influence in the U.S. has in fact increased during the past 14 years in America.

According to the survey, the number of Creole speakers in United States has increased by 73 percent from 2000 to 2014. In 2000, Creole was the 14th most common language spoken at home. In 2014, it is ranks 10th.

Creole speakers are found mainly in South Florida, Massachusetts, and in New York City.

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Learning French the main goal of education in Haiti

French Vs Creole in the Haitian Culture

Haiti is a country of 10 million, give or take. Of that number, more than 90% speak Creole. The constitution of 1987 mentioned Creole as the single most binding language among the Haitian people. Why then is it still marginalized, and why is French, spoken by only 10% of the population, still the dominant language in the professional Haitian world, to the detriment of the majority of the population? It is these issues that Jacques Pierre, a Creole Studies professor at Duke University, is asking in an open forum for his recent piece in the Miami Herald called 'Haiti's French/Creole Divide'.

Like most countries in the Caribbean, Haiti's people speak their own blend of languages that is often very distinct from country to country. The problem lies in the class and social divide created by the different strata, in which those who speak Creole are labeled as unintelligent, and those who speak French are considered superior by virtue of the skill.

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Haitian-Canadian Dany Laferriere New Member of Academie Francaise

Dany Laferriere

Haiti has grown in national pride with the election of Haitian-Canadian author, Dany Laferriere, to the Academie Francaise. President Martelly made the announcement of Laferriere's selection to the Academie public on December 12, 2013. It is a great honor for Haiti, Martelly said, that Laferriere who rose from Petit-Goâve to national prominence has now become part of an international community of renowned writers.

Prime Minster Lamothe also commented on Laferriere's selection as a reflection of the importance and immensity of his work, international reputation and contribution to literature

Laferriere, a sexagenarian, lives in Montreal and has written more than a dozen novels and as many essays. His 2009 autobiographical novel, L'enigme du retour, which recounted his return to Haiti after his father passed away, nabbed the distinguished Prix Medicis award. His first novel, Comment faire l'amour avec un negre sans se fatiguer, was published in 1985. He later wrote the screenplay adaptation for the film.

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Ekrivin Dany Laferriere antre nan Akademi France, se gro zafe oiu

Dany Laferriere A Haitian-Canadian Novelist

Mezanmi, me yon examp po montre kapacite Ayisien. Ekrivin Dany Laferrière konyer-a fè pati de gro tet yo nan institisyon sa yo rele "French Academy". nan Lang France, yo rele li:"Académie française"

Min Se Kisa li ye minm?

Sa se yon group zotobre a babinn

Anbin, se yon group moun ki responsab pou yo veye sou devlopman Lang sa yo rele France-a. Akademi sa ginyin yon gro istwa deyè li. Li te kreye pa Cardinal Richelieu nan lanne 1635 (se pa de lanne). Akademi sa kompze de 40 mamb ki sipose rete pou jis kaske yo mouri.

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Haitians who refer to French when caught lying

French Vs Creole in the Haitian Culture

Why do Haitians have to speak French when they are cornered or caught lying? You probably think I am once again making this up; however if you haven't notice that, I am asking that you pay close attention to our leaders during their conversation.

As a Haitian observer, I have been observing this for a while and I think it is about time that we talk about it.

Don't you realize that by now that many of our leaders will change a nice Creole conversation into French? I suspects that their French comes up usually whenever they are caught lying or want to bluff us. At that point most become very philosophical. You start hearing:

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Creole community united

Some Facts about Haitian Creole

The Creole community is constantly growing in the world. Recently on 28th October they celebrated 28th annual gathering in Victoria, the Creole capital of the world. In the international calendar this day is remembered as "World Creole Day". Many musicians from La Reunion, Mauritius, Rodrigues, Martinique, Seychelles and Haiti performed one after another on this occasion before joining a family show at the end.

Many journalists were present in the audience. "Unbelievable" was the one single word to describe their experiences in the diversity and self belongingness displayed by the community. Alain St.Ange, the Seychelles Minister for Tourism and Culture said Seychelles feels proud to host this annual gathering of the Creole community and by presenting many talented musicians from six islands from the world of Creoles.

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Haiti's Low Cultural Diversity Owing to Mulato Elite

Haiti among least diverse countries in the world

In a study conducted by Erkan Gören, a scientist at Germany's Oldenburg University, he has determined how culturally diverse countries are, according to databanks compiled of each country's ethnic and racial demographics. Among 180 countries surveyed, Haiti showed little cultural diversity when assigned a computer-generated rating.

To clarify, the concept of cultural diversity is separate from racial diversity. Cultural diversity is based on racial and ethnic diversities. The more types of racial and ethnic populations, the more languages and cultural values they share.

Haiti's racial lineage began with the indigenous Taino Indians, who were bred out of existence by slaves emigrating from the Republic of Congo. At the same time, the Spanish and French invasions changed Haiti's racial and cultural profile further. The French and the Spanish battled for control of Hispaniola. Eventually the French retained control of the western half of the island, and the Spanish the larger eastern segment, named the Dominican Republican. The French interbred with African slaves, producing the light-skinned mulatto elite, who were high-born and spoke French. The low-born and darker-skinned Haitians were of Spanish and African blood.

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Language Discrimination in Haiti: French Vs Haitian Creole

French Vs Creole in the Haitian Culture

French and Creole are the two official languages of Haiti and still, French is given more importance than Creole. This discrimination, as seen by many intellectuals worldwide, is primarily because of the fact that Creole is a mix of several West African languages and French. Creole, which is today the lingua franca, actually started when African slaves arrived at Saint Domingue and tried to speak French by whatever they picked up through listening. The reason why they tried to speak French was that the African slaves from different parts of West Africa had different languages and they failed to communicate with each other. Hence, they picked up French.

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