Eugene Wants Creation Of Haitian Day For U.S. And New York City


Haitian-American, Dr. Mathieu Eugene, wants the United States to recognize the contributions Haitians have made to America and New York City. As a Brooklyn Council Member he presented two resolutions to the Council. The resolutions asked federal and New York state governments to create an annual Haitian Day on national and local levels.

Haiti's contributions go back to the Civil War, 250 years ago, when Haitians fought in the Revolutionary War. One Haitian-American Revolutionary soldier, Jean Baptist su Sable, founded Chicago.

Eugene brought to attention Haitian-American philanthropist and freed slave, Pierre Toussaint, who established an orphanage and donated a significant portion of his fortune to erect St. Patrick's Cathedral.

In the early 19th century, civil rights champion, Haitian-American W.E.B. DuBois, edited the New York City magazine, The Crisis, in which he criticized segregationists, advocating equal rights for everyone.

Presently, native-born Brooklyn-ite and Haitian-American, Rodney Leon, has been the architect of many New York City structures, among them Lower Manhattan's African Burial Ground Memorial.

Eugene also serves on the Council Youth Services Committee as Chairperson, and sits on the Council Committees for Civil Rights, Fire and Criminal Justice, Health, Immigration, and Small Business. He believes ". . . the . . . cultural and social contributions . . . Haitians have made to the United States and (New York City) . . ." makes it ". . . appropriate . . . the government . . . recognize those remarkable achievements."

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