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Health

The Health Category addresses all issues related to Health care in Haiti, starting with the availability of medical services for the Haitian population, where people can find health care in Haiti and also how to improve the system

Senior U.N. Official Cheering an Investigation over Misuse of PetroCaribe Funds

The Haitian government is not happy with the comment made by Susan D. Page, a special representative and head of the United Nations Mission for Justice Support in Haiti (MINUJUSTH). As per Haitian foreign minister, Antonio Rodrigue, in last February, Ms. Page exceeded her authority by welcoming an investigation into the alleged misuse of Venezuela-sponsored PetroCaribe funds by the previous Haitian administrations. Ms. Page reportedly made an applaud on the corruption inquiry into the alleged siphoning $2 billion oil loans from Venezuela as PetroCaribe money. These embezzlements happened between 2008 and 2016 under the administrations of former presidents Rene Preval and Michel Martelly. According to minister Rodrigue, Ms. Page's attitude is harmful to the political and institutional stability acquired during the past few years.

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Risk for Hepatitis, Malaria, Typhoid, Cholera, Rabies, Yellow Fever in Haiti

Vaccines protect travelers from serious diseases. Depending on where you travel, you may come into contact with diseases that are rare in your country. It is recommended to get vaccinated at least 4 to 6 weeks before you travel. This will give the vaccines time to start working, so you're protected while you're traveling. Travelers can get typhoid through contaminated food or water in Haiti. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends typhoid vaccine for most travelers, especially if you are staying with friends or relatives, visiting smaller cities or rural areas, or if you are an adventurous eater.

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Port-Au-Prince, One of the Largest Cities in the World without a Sewage System

Port-au-Prince is about the size of Chicago. There are 987,000 people living in Port-Au-Prince and 2.6 million living in the 'metropolitan' area. But the city doesn't have a central sewage system. Furthermore, an estimated one in five Haitians doesn't have access to any kind of toilet.

In the fall of 2010, months after the devastating earthquake, when cholera first entered Haiti (first time over a century), most likely by the United Nations peacekeeping troops from Nepal, the disease became endemic-- more than a half-million people got sick and at least 7,050 died. The only way to prevent the cholera endemic is to build a network of pipes and waste treatment plants to prevent the infection of food and water supplies.

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The truth about the introduction of AIDS from the U.S. to Haiti

By Dr. Gérard Alphonse Férère, Professor Emeritus, Saint Joseph's University.

As part of his vulgar and spurious statements against Haiti and her citizens, Donald Trump allegedly declared that "all Haitians have AIDS". Such erroneous statement would illustrate the level of his paroxysmal lack of information about that proud and loving people. Hereafter, a clear historical and scientific discussion of what I call "The truth about the introduction of AIDS from the U.S. to Haiti". It was in 1981 that two occurrences of the disease were formally confirmed in the continental United States, but it is believed that these were not necessarily the first. Soon after, in 1982, a most incorrect and unfortunate decision by the American medical authorities was made, when rushing to judgment, they indiscriminately included all Haitians among their so-called "high risk groups", together with homosexual men and I.V. drug users. In that regard, positions were taken and official statements made in very irresponsible manners by people who should have known better. As a consequence of their ignorance, their lack of sensitivity and their unscientific behavior, a whole nation was stigmatized. And still remains maligned, as proven by Donald Trump's alleged accusation.

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Responding to Pediatric Diabetes in Haiti

Hôpital Sacré Coeur (HSC), a beacon of hope for the 250,000 people of Northern Haiti, is the largest private hospital in the North of Haiti. Located in the town of Milot, Haiti, the present day 200-bed hospital has been providing uninterrupted service for almost 30 years. The hospital started with Dr. Theodore Dubuque, Jr. when he visited Milot in 1986 from St. Louis to assess whether it was feasible to perform surgery at the 6-bed clinic with one physician and a single operating room. Till today, Dr. Theodore Dubuque, Jr. has made over 50 trips to Haiti to start and run this largest hospital in Haiti with financial support. Dubuque is the founder and past president of the CRUDEM Foundation, which supports Hôpital Sacré Coeur in Milot.

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UN intensify efforts to eliminate cholera from Haiti

On August 19, 2016, the former UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon announced a new approach by the United Nations to cholera in Haiti. In his statement, he indicated that the UN deeply regrets the terrible suffering the people of Haiti have endured as a result of the cholera epidemic and that the United Nations has a commitment and moral responsibility to the victims of the cholera epidemic and to support Haiti in overcoming the epidemic.

The United Nation's new approach is intended to intensify efforts to eliminate cholera from Haiti and assist and support those most directly affected. The approach consists two tracks.

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FSIL, the highest ranked baccalaureate nursing program in Haiti

Faculté des Sciences In­firmières de Université Episcopale d'Haïti or Faculty of Nursing Science of the Episcopal University of Haiti, (FSIL) was created in January, 2005 by the Presbyterian Church. Until today, it remains the only baccalaureate nursing school in the country.

Unlike the majority of other nursing schools in Haiti that only teach up to a diploma levels, their program is competency based which teaches and trains their nurses to critically identify case specific responsibility and develop problem solving model. The nursing students of FSIL receive practical clinical training at Hôpital Ste. Croix.

Scholarship is available to some students. However, those who receive scholarship support are obligated to commit two years compulsory service in Haiti before they receive their diplomas.

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Nursing Care in Haiti

Haiti is a medical backwater. The country lacks state-of-the-art hospitals and clinics, modern medical resources, sufficient numbers of trained nurses, doctors and other medical staff, diagnostic technology, medical devices, and medicines. For decades Haiti has lived like a medical missionary's missionh where thousands of foreign non-governmental organizations, committed and compassionate nurses and doctors travel to offer medical service and then fly back to the developed world.

In January 2005, FSIL (Faculté des Sciences In­firmières de lfUniversité Episcopale dfHaïti or Faculty of Nursing Science of the Episcopal University of Haiti) was created with the affiliation of the Presbyterian Church. The nursing school was conceived as a part of the expanding medical outreach in Léogâne, Haiti. FSIL is the only baccalaureate nursing school in Haiti. It is the only nursing school in Haiti that trains nurses to perform specific specialized tasks. Its curriculum is a competency based nursing care that teaches nurses to critically identify the case specific responsibility and develop the problem solving model. The majority of other nursing schools in Haiti teach up to diploma levels. The students of this nursing school are taught by Haitians and volunteers from the United States.

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The argument for limiting consumption of Air Conditioner

12 Tricks to Survive Hot Summer Nights (Without AC)

It is always a big relief and quite refreshing to walk into a cool room after being out in the hot sun. But very few of us are aware that prolonged use of air conditioners causes more harm than good. It plays havoc on our skin and hair. Our skins are not sufficiently protected to combat it; the chill of AC pulls out moisture from the skin and leave it feels dry and stretched. The people with dry skin must have noticed that their skin becomes flaky after regular or prolonged exposure to AC, because constant dryness affects the inner layer of the skin.

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The clothes you wear affect your attractiveness to mosquito

Mosquito Species

Did you know the clothes you wear may determine the number of mosquito bites you receive? Some colors are. mosquitoes have well developed vision and smell senses. They use both effectively to locate and attack the human they want to draw blood from

According to medical entomologist Jonathan Day at the University of Florida, someone who wears colors thath stand out such as black, blue or red, they become targets for mosquito bites

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