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immigration

Immigration is a major issue among Haitian. It is estimated that over 4 million Haitians are currently living outside of Haiti

Haitian-Canadian Dominique Anglade, Quebec's new minister of economy

Dominique Anglade Canadian elected to National Assembly of Quebec

With pride we announce that one of our own, Haitian-Canadian Dominique Anglade, is Quebec's new minister of the economy, science and innovation and digital strategy. She has an engineering degree from École Polytechnique and a Masters in business administration from the École des Hautes Études Commerciales (HEC). Dominique Anglade held various positions in the past such as president of Montreal International, she also headed the Montreal office of business consultancy McKinsey & Co.

Good luck to you Dominique


Haitian Kreyol:

Ayisyen-Kanadyen Dominique Anglade Anglade, nouvo minis Quebec nan ekonomi

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Haitian, the Third Most Populous Foreign-Born In Boston

A December 2015 report prepared by the Boston Redevelopment Authority Research Division reveals that Boston is the 7th largest home for foreign-born residents among the 25 largest U.S. cities. Between 2000 and 2014, its foreign-born population grew from 151,836 to 177,461, an increase from earlier 19.2% to present 27.1%. The top six countries of origin for the foreign born population living in Boston in 2014 were as follows: Dominican Republic 13.0%, China 10.6%, Haiti 7.6%, El Salvador 6.3%, Vietnam 6.2% and Jamaica 4.4%. Haitian migration to the U.S was very small (around 5,000) in 1960. Recent data from the U.S Census Bureau on American Community Surveys show that the Haitian immigrant population numbers between the years 1980 and 2012 in the U.S were as follows: 92,000 (1980), 225,000 (1990), 419,000 (2000), 510,000 (2006), 587,000 (2010) and 606,000 (2012). Five metro areas, such as greater Miami, New York, Boston, Orlando, and Atlanta account for nearly three-quarters of the total immigrant population from Haiti residing in the United States. Haitians are the third most populous foreign-born demographic residents of Boston. On the language front, with its 4.2% share, French Creole is the third most common non-English language spoken at home and it is followed by Spanish 16.3% and Chinese 4.6%.

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Yo ape anmede, entimide, pwovoke Ayisyen pou yo kite Ti Ayiti

Little Haiti residents protest gentrification of Little Haiti

Paske yo te ape fè fas ak pi wo lwaye, moun nan Ti Ayiti nan Miami ap di ase se ase. Nan Jedi, 3 Desanm, 2015, yon gwoup rezidan, pwopriyetè biznis ak aktivis kominotè te mete ansanm nan yon katye nan Ti Ayiti pou te pwotèste kont chanjman sa yo kote prix kay yo ape monte e yo oblije so nan yon kominote ke yo renmen anpil. Gen kèk nan devlopè ki enterese nan zòn nan yo te akize ki sèvi avèk arasman, entimidasyon pou fòse rezidan yo ak biznis lokal yo soti. Gen kèk moun kpote siy ak deklarasyon sa yo: "Nou vle rete", "non pou jantrifikasyon", "Little Ayiti se pa pou vann" ak plis ankò. Anpil moun nan zòn nan santi ke si yo pa aji, byento Little Ayiti pral disparèt.

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Dominique Anglade, member of Quebec Liberal Party

Dominique Anglade (born January 31, 1974) is a Canadian politician, a member of the Quebec Liberal Party. Since winning the National Assembly election of Quebec on November 9, 2015, she is representing the electoral district of Saint-Henri-Sainte-Anne.

She is an engineer, businesswoman and the former president of the Coalition Avenir Québec (CAQ). Her father was a professor, geographer, writer, and the founder of the University of Quebec in Montreal. Her mother Mireille Neptune was a committed feminist. Her parents tragically died in the 2010 earthquake. Anglade has received many great accolades likes of "Young Global Leader 2014 (by World Economic Forum), Toussaint 2013 Award by the Young Haitian Chamber of Commerce of Montreal, the Quebec Order of Engineers (2011). In 2010, she chaired the Canadian Conference 150 on behalf of the Liberal Party of Canada.

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Gentrification is threatening Little Haiti

Miami's downtown boom and rising price for the space are pressing and threatening Little Haiti's longtime residents and business owners to move to some affordable places. Another big concern for the local Haitians is related to self owned properties.

About 85% of the Haitian owner rent their properties and sign their agreements without understanding what they are signing, and most of them sign without the presence of their lawyers. On December 3rd, they gathered in Miami's Little Haiti neighborhood to deliver messages about the rapidly changing neighborhood and its preservation:

"Little Haiti is not for sale, Say no to gentrification, We want to stay." However, as per the statement of the Northeast Second Avenue Partnership (NE2P) authority, it is attempting to revitalize the area while preserving (?) authentic Haitian culture, art and history -- and the people who produce them.

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Little Haiti, Speckled With Art since At Least 1994, Before Wynwood

The Wynwood Art District, in the neighborhood of Miami was founded in the early 2003 by a group of art dealers, artists and curators. Once it was a home of over 70 galleries and museums and was a haven for local artists in the early 2000s.

Gradually, Wynwood district became the epicenter of new Miami. The sudden surge in the real estate price, gentrification and higher rent forced many artists and gallery owners to migrate to some other nearby affordable locations while the art loving community kept moving towards Little Haiti. Unlike the art people of Wynwood, the artists and gallery owners of Little Haiti had preferred buying spaces instead of hiring.

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Little Haiti, the next prominent neighborhood for art and real estate

University of Miami students in Little Haiti

An advise to all Haitians owning a property in the Little Haiti area in Miami, do not sell. There is a chance that your current property in Little Haiti will value much more in just a few years. According to the New York Times, signs of Little Haiti's impending transformation are everywhere. As the real estate market is exploding in Wynwood, the next neighborhood the artists are moving in for art and real estate is Little Haiti. In just a few years, rent has tripled in price in the Wynwood area. As the artists are being priced out, many have turned to Little Haiti. One particular point is that the artists are more interested in buying properties than renting. As Art Basel is scheduled for December, you can expect to see lots of activities in the Little Haiti neighborhood.

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Trudeau Reinstate Temporary Moratorium for Haitians

Now many members of the Haitian community in Canada can breathe a sigh of relief over the recent announcement by the new Canadian Government of Trudeau. As per the announcement dated December 11, 2015, confirmed by the Canadian Minister of Immigration John McCallum, Canada has suspended the earlier announced deportation of Haitian and Zimbabwean nationals. The Government Trudeau has reinstated a moratorium on deportation of these two nations who were feared of being deported to their native lands.

We may recall that in last December (2014), the former federal Conservative government lifted the moratoria on removals to Haiti and Zimbabwe. Those who were affected by the withdrawal, were informed to submit an application to the Canadian Council for Refugees on humanitarian and compassionate grounds before June 1, 2015, otherwise they could face forced deportation. As per the announcement, it was further communicated that the susceptible immigrants would not be deported before the last date of application or while awaiting the decision on their H&C applications.

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Dweynie Esther Paul, first Haitian American New York court judge

Dweynie Esther Paul, elected as New York State civil court judge

Here is another first with the Haitian Diaspora in New York. Attorney Dweynie Esther Paul has become the first Haitian American to be elected as a civil court judge in the State of New York

What do you think?

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The reason why U.S. is quiet about birthright citizenship

Trump's Proposed Immigration Plan could Cost up to $600 Billion

The international community has looked upon the Dominican Republic's (DR) immigration policy with disfavor. It has been deporting Haitian immigrants and their Dominican-born children, sending them to neighboring Haiti. The DR Supreme Court ruled in 2013 children of non-Dominican parentage, residing in the DR between 1929 and 2010, claim no residency rights and should be deported. The majority of non-Dominicans in the DR are Haitian.

The DR's actions have become a campaign topic for the U.S. Republican Party. Its presidential candidates want to re-amend the Constitution's 14th Amendment to strip the progeny of immigrants to the U.S. of citizenship. In particular, Republicans want immigrant women, who have given birth to babies on U.S. soil, to be deported.

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