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Agriculture - Haiti Observer Blog

Agriculture, Haiti Observer Blog. Read the following articles about Agriculture


 

Selling Land to multiple Buyers, a problem in Haiti

Many reasons exist as to why reconstruction efforts in Haiti are dragging: pledges reneged on, mis-spending, and lack of transparency. The latest obstacle to reconstruction projects is leniency in Haiti's National Land Registry Office (NLRO) regulations.

The problem with land-registry procedures began in 1804, the year of Haiti's independence from French rule. Haiti's second president, Jean-Jacques Dessalines, urged land reform as part of his platform. But in intervening years up until the present, a loophole in the NLRO's procedural guidelines has indirectly caused stalled road reconstruction and other infrastructure projects in Haiti.

Protocol for land transfers includes inspection, notarization, and fulfillment of tax assessor requirements. Bypassing bureaucratic red tape and exorbitant fees, land owners have devised their own land-transfer strategies.

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New Green Farming Center Promotes Sustainability Practices in Haiti

Agriculture is Haiti's most important but under-utilized resource. Not enough has been done to increase crop yields or exports in the world market. But a sustainability movement has started in some parts of the country, creating The Center for Rural Sustainable Development (CRSD), launched in Kenscoff. Present for the ribbon-cutting ceremony were Agriculture Ministers and Pamela White, U.S. Ambassador to Haiti.

The center will be operated by University of Florida sustainability experts, who will instruct farmers on greenhouse, drip irrigation, and vertical farming practices. The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) has underwritten the project. Conceived as a modern teaching facility, instructors will show farmers best practices for green farming. They will teach them how to grow different crop types, operate the latest farm equipment, and become responsible stewards of the environment.

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Livelihood In the town of Carice, Haiti

Thousands of people live in Carice, a remote town located in the Vallieres arrondissement in Haiti. According to statistics, the town has about 12,000 residents. Carice is a rural area without as many sources of livelihood as in cities and industrialized towns. This is why people rely on agriculture for their main livelihood. Farmers in the town mostly harvest mangoes, bananas and coffee, which are considered the main and most popular products in the area.

Though agriculture is the main source of livelihood in the town, deforestation is still common. As a matter of fact, deforestation affected the soil quality in the town. Despite this, however, the production of crops remains and continues to support people's livelihood.

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Ties in Bilateral Trade between Vietnam and Haiti

As per the Vietnam government's 2011 records, there is an increase in bilateral trade between Vietnam and Haiti. In 2010 there was a raise of $11 million in the two way trade after which it reached $40 million in 2011. Vietnamese exports are valued at around $15 million.

Haiti's Openness to Trade

Laurent Lamothe, Haiti's Prime Minister stated at the Monday meeting with Nyuyen Tan Dung, Prime Minister of Vietnam that the number stood at $19 million thorough the first six months of 2012. Lamothe continued to make efforts to push the message across that Haiti was open to trade.

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What To Do After Floods Hit Farms And Crops

Flood in Haiti

Haiti is still reeling from the impact of Hurricane Sandy, which damaged a large amount of crops and agriculture produce in the country. According to reports, floods covered almost the entire southern part of the country. This means that not only houses are affected but also crop and livestock farms. As a matter of fact, officials are now worried that losses in crop production can lead to food shortages.

Disasters such as floods are not uncommon in Haiti and this is the reason why people, particularly farmers, should always be prepared. However, it is not everytime that farmers have enough time to keep their farms safe from floods. In this case, one must know how to deal with the floods' effects on their farm goods.

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Partnership with Saint Thomas University helps bring Haiti's coffee to the global market

Coffee used to be Haiti's main agricultural industry; the country is also one of the Caribbean's oldest and original coffee producers. Yet Haitian coffee has been overlooked and unrecognized in the world market. This is due to the difficulty in entering Haitian coffee to the international market, as well as the lack of benefits given to local coffee growers, thus a decline in local production. But recently, new light and hope has been given to the country's declining coffee industry.

The Haitian government, in partnership with Saint Thomas University, launched the Café COCANO Fair-Trade Coffee Project five years ago and has since been able to help boost Haiti's coffee market and assist local farmers in production and compensation. This project is also in partnership with the Cafeiere et Cacouyere du Nord' Ouest Coffee Cooperative, Pascucci Torrefazione, an Italian coffee roaster, and the University's Center for Peace and Justice.

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Anse-a-Veau in Nippes Department

Within the Department of Nippes, sits the Anse-à-Veau Arrondissement. Five hamlet-like villages comprise Anse-à-Veau: Arnaud, L'Asile, Petit-Trou-des-Nippes, and Plaisance-du-Sud.

Anse-à-Veau has a population estimated to be between 31,000-55,000. Founded in 1721 as a cityship, it lies below left of Ile Gonave and an inlet of the Caribbean Sea. Three sub-divisions make up Anse-à-Veau: Grande-Rivière-Joly, Sault-des-Baril-Moinsard, and Baconnois-Grand-Fond.

Following Haiti's magnitude 7.0 2010 earthquake, which reduced most of Haiti to rubble, thousands upon thousands of Port-au-Prince survivors overflowed Anse-à-Veau, severely straining its people and services.

Anse-à-Veau's main income-producing activities are agriculture and fishing. Farmlands produce coffee, sugarcane, lemons, and oranges, and use sustainability practices. Cotton-growing also takes place. The small-craft fishing industry plies its trade along Anse-à-Veau's coastline.

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Elie Lescot and the SHADA Project

During WWII when the Axis Powers managed to cut off the Eastern rubber supply, the then Haitian President, Elie Lescot proposed an ambitious to USA. He proposed to rapidly increase the rubber production during the war period in the countryside of Haiti. $5 million was granted by Washington's Export-Import Bank in 1941 so that rubber plantation can be developed in Haiti. This ambitious program was named at Société Haïtiano-Américane de Développement Agricole or SHADA. Thomas Fennell, an American agronomist managed the SHADA program.

Using US military support, Lescot administration cleared 47,177 acres of land by 1943 with the purpose of planting high latex-yielding cryptostegia vine. Over time, 100,000 hectares of land were claimed by the SHADA project. During this period, Elie Lescot campaigned and sold people the idea that SHADA will only improve and modernize agriculture in Haiti. However, Haitian families were forcibly removed from arable lands and nearly a million trees capable of bearing fruit were cut down.

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Livestock Identification and Control of Slaughter in Haiti

Haiti's livestock plays an important role in the country's agriculture sector. From poultry to cattle, Haiti is able to export millions of kilos of animal meat a year. But this has been dramatically decreasing through the years because of the lack proper slaughter houses and the poor conditions of livestock due to untreated diseases.

In line with the Martelly administration's efforts in improving and developing the country's agriculture through livestock, especially in the rural areas, Haiti's Secretary of State for Animal Production of Ministry of Agriculture, Natural Resources and Rural Development (MARNDR) organized preparatory workshop for farmers in August on the upcoming launch of a national system for livestock identification and control of slaughter.

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The two Terms Haitian President Rene Preval

Haitian politics has been shaped by decades of power struggles between people in power, as well as with the country's citizens. Long-time politician René Préval has witnessed and experienced them all.

Before becoming a politician, Préval first became an agronomist, which has something to do with the science and technology of agriculture. After acquiring his studies in Belgium and Italy and living in New York for five years, he went home to Haiti and worked for the National Institute for Mineral Resources and was very active in agricultural activities in Haitian society. Préval then put up his own bakery and remained active political movements and charity, which led him to meet Jean-Bertrand Aristide, the country's first democratic president. In 1991, he served as Haiti's Prime Minister for eight months before going into exile after a military coup.

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