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Agriculture and Food

We do our best to address all the problems related to agriculture and food. You will have the opportunity to discover some of the best Haitian dishes as well

Nourimanba Production Facility Treatments For Malnutrition in Haiti

Nourimanba Treatments For Malnutrition in Haiti

Pediatric malnutrition is sadly prevalent in Haiti. The major problem with the epidemic is that, as well as the bloated stomachs common to the issue, children are at the risk of their growth being physically hindered by the stunting effects of the lack of protein that plagues those from poor countries. Hoping to offer a permanent solution to the problem, a new product to combat malnutrition, called Nourimanba, has been developed and a batch shipped for distribution in Haiti.

High in calories and protein, Nourimanba is a peanut based food that uses vegetable oil, a much needed mixture of vitamins as well as sugar to provide a balanced meal in one serving to children at risk. The venture will be highly localized, with a Haitian-run facility, using peanuts grown by farmers within the country. The pilot project, giving patronage to 300 local farmers, will also serve to ramp up the quality of the supplied peanuts being used at the factory.

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Haiti Continues to Receiving Food Aid & Not Agricultural Support

Kombit involving Haitian Women

Haiti has been depending on food aid for over last 50 years. Decades of inexpensive imports has destroyed the local agriculture. Haitian import tariff on food at 3% are among the lowest in the Caribbean. As a result, Haiti is unable to feed himself.

Today Haiti depends on the outside world nearly most of its sustenance. Fifty five percent of the food eaten in the country is imported, mostly from U.S and the Dominican Republic; this includes 80% of all the rice consumed within the country. However, recently some of the international aid agencies have raised a cry of alarm. Haiti is facing severe food shortage. Almost two-thirds of the population (around 7 million people) is hungry.

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Ayiti Manje Lokal - Let's promote Local Production

Typical Haitian Food, Avocado

Here is a video I found and wanted to share with you. In brief this video is being promoted by Harry Nicolas, AKA: Met Fey Vet. The video shows the various food items produced locally in Haiti that we can consume without the necessity to import from the Dominican republic or the US.

Mo Chè, pou-m di ou vrèman, Lè k map gade mage sa yo, Bouch mwen kole dlow"

Now do you remember Harry Nicolas. He is the Haitian nationalist who successfully organized the "Kita Nago". He helped organized the walk of unity. He is the same person who has been promoting this concept. "Ayiti Manje Lokal"

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Agriculture Minister Thomas Jacques Promotes Banana Production

Haitian Food, Fried Plantain Or Banane Peze

At this year's World Food Day in Haiti the theme was "Sustainable food systems at the service of food security and nutrition". Minister of Agriculture, Thomas Jacques, spoke on banana production, which has declined noticeably within the last two decades. The Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on Agriculture issued a report, citing banana production was under 450,000 metric tons by 2009. In 1999 banana production was 600,000 metric tons.

Bananas are one of the largest-volume exports Haiti has had in the past, and Jacques hopes for resurgence in banana production and consumption in the future. With funds available to up banana production, employment opportunities would increase and food insufficiency decrease.

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Popular Bicha Ad for Bakara criticised by Barbancourt , Pa Banm Kou

Daniel Fils-Aime As Tonton Bicha, A Success In Making His Character

Tonton Bicha, an expert in advertising, seems to be getting into some hot water recently. According to some who listen to his latest advertising he did for the Rhum Bakara, the suggested that Tonton bicha went too far in putting down Rhum Barbancourt and the Haitian Voodoo religion.

Tonton Bicha actually never mentioned the name of the competitor Barbancourt in his ad; however, that doesn't stop people from assuming that he was clearly referring to Barbancourt rhum

He stated in the ad "Pa Banm Kou" to refer to the competitor which seem to me very different from "Barbancourt", or is it?

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Four Seasons Hotels to start Serving Haitian Coffee

Haiti blue Forest Coffee finest in the world

Four non-government organizations (NGOs) have partnered to aid coffee producers in Haiti, growing coffee beans for the export market. The Clinton and Leslois Shaw Foundations, along with La Columbe Torrefaction and Four Seasons Hotels, have revealed Four Seasons will start offering Haitian coffee on its menus. The variety chosen for inclusion on the menus is a coffee bean indigenous to mountainous areas enfolding Thiotte. La Columbe is the coffee bean wholesaler.

Part of a long-term partnership to outsource Haitian coffee to wider markets, the NGOs intend to create more employment opportunities and raise the standard of living for many Haitians as the enterprise develops new markets.

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Haitian Government Signs Deal for First Agricultural Free Zone

Government improving Investment Law to make Haiti Business Friendly

A memorandum of understanding was signed by government of Haiti (GOH) officials and a business investor, in anticipation of an Agricultural Free Zone (AFZ), Haiti's first. The AFZ will be developed in the town of Nourribo.

Signatories Trade and Industry Minister, Wilson Laleau; Directorate of Free Zones Director General, Rode Préval; and Agitrans CEO, Jovenel Moïse, say the project will produce 13,000 employment opportunities over a five-year span. Minister Laleau emphasized the Martelly-Lamothe government wants to support and foster ". . . rapid investment in all sectors". They also welcome more private investment in "structural projects in agriculture . . ."

Haiti, known as the poorest country in the western hemisphere, is a victim of food insufficiency. Causes are soil erosion and barrenness, mountainous terrain, and torrential rains. Of Haiti's ten million population, just over half consume an adequate diet. The rest suffer from malnutrition. One-third of crop yields rot because of inadequate processing methods, absence of storage houses, and transportation infrastructure.

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Food Subsidies or Agricultural Investment? Which is Best for Haiti's Economy?

Government improving Investment Law to make Haiti Business Friendly

Food aid has been delivered to Haiti for the past 60 years, in two decades 1.5 million tons. Seven million people out of a population of 10 million suffer from hunger, and 1.5 million suffer acute chronic malnutrition. Infrastructure weaknesses, waste, and "the perverse effects" concerning food aid drive the crisis.

The government of Haiti (GOH) and outside donors pay no attention to the agricultural sector, pertaining to its growth and sustainability. The industry accounts for one-quarter of gross domestic product (GDP), but that figure has dropped. For many decades, scant investment from GOH and outside donors has occurred. Conversely, food-aid funding outpaces agricultural funding by more than 50%.

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Making Plantain Purre or Labouyi Bannann, the Haitian Way

The making of Plantain Purre or Labouyi Bannann

A truly versatile meal that can be enjoyed at any time of the day, Plantain Purre or Labouyi Bannann is a favorite in Haiti. Its wholesome, filling portions make for a nutritious, appetizing treat.

What you will need:
• 1 plantain (green)
• 1 banana (ripe)
• 12 oz can of evaporated milk (soy milk can be substituted)
• 12 to 14 oz can of coconut milk, or 1 cup of regular milk
• 1/4 tsp. of vanilla extract
• 3 sticks of cinnamon
• 2 anise stars (whole)
• A pinch of grated nutmeg
• 1/2 a cup of sugar (can be either white or brown)
• 1/2 tsp. lime rind (grated) or 1/2 an inch lime rind (whole)

What you should do:
1. Peel the plantain and then cut it into slices of about 1/2 an inch in thickness.
2. Puree plantain slices in a blender with 2 cups of water and the ripe banana.
3. Bring plantain and banana puree to boil over low to medium heat and bring to a boil.
4. Add additional ingredients, evaporated or soy milk, coconut milk or regular milk, vanilla extract, anise stars, sugar, lime rind and nutmeg.
5. Bring to boil and stir occasionally.
6. Cook for 15-20 minutes until it becomes the consistency of oatmeal. Serve while still hot.

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Toussaint Coffee Liqueur Being Re-Marketed in Great Britain

Toussaint Coffee Liqueur, named for Haiti's liberator, Toussaint Louverture, is a more intense version of Mexico's Tia Maria and Kahlua. It is less sweet and contains a richer coffee flavor. A blend of Arabica coffee beans and aged Caribbean rum, with an alcohol content of 30%, it became popular in Europe and other import markets.

For undisclosed reasons, the Toussaint Coffee Liqueur brand was discontinued, and had not been available anywhere except perhaps on the island under another name. But Quintessential Brands, which owns the patent, transferred from its original creator, Anker Horn, signed a new licensing agreement with G&J Distillers to produce the liqueur with a new recipe as well as a redesigned bottle.

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