How To Make Dous Makos Or Douce Marcos

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Douce Marcos or Dous Makos from Petit Goave

Haiti is home to the most exotic and colorful cuisine in the world. Most of Haiti's cuisine originated from the country's historical settlers like the Africans and the French. One of the country's many delicious foods known worldwide is the Dous Makos.

The Dous Makos was created by Fernand Macos back in 1939, a Belgian entrepreneur who settled and put up his business in the coastal town of Petit-Goave in Haiti. The popular delicacy's recipe was at first a secret but was generally known to be made of milk and was commercialized years after. There are now dozens of producers of the Dous Makos that sell and export their produce to different parts of the world.

The Dous Makos is basically made from concentrated milk. It is usually composed of five layers of different colors. The delicacy is also commonly molded to a rectangular shape and is then manually cut. Milk makes up 80% to 90% of Dous Makos. A variety of milk can be used, such as pure milk, sweet and condensed milk, powdered milk, and evaporated milk.

The flavor of Dous Makos depends on the extra ingredients added. The common add-ons put for the flavor and aroma of this delicacy are chocolate, cinnamon, citrus peels, peanut butter, almonds, vanilla, and even strong rum.

The process of making Dous Makos starts with combining milk, sugar, and optional cinnamon in order to make a concentrated mixture. The mixture then hardens and the other ingredients such as chocolate, vanilla, and food coloring are added. The layers of different colors are then arranged and the raw Dous Makos is cooked in the pan for six hours.

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Read more: food, Petit-Goave, Douce Makos, Douce Marcos, Fernand Macos, recipe, Dous Makos, Agriculture and Food

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Reader Comments 1

Caro says...

This article doesn't say how to make it, but rather what it's made of. Is there a recipe on how to make it?

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